“Washington, D.C., moved a big step closer this week toward building its own “bridge to the future.” Two well-known design firms — OMA and OLIN — were selected as the winners of a competition to conceptualize the 11th Street Bridge Park.
The plan is an inventive reuse of old infrastructure that could help to revitalize a long-underserved part of the city. The old crumbling 11th Street Bridge used to carry the I-295 freeway over Anacostia River. It has since been replaced, and the deck of the old bridge has been demolished, leaving only the piers standing in the middle of the water. The city wants to top those old piers with a brand new park and a new bridge intended to support foot traffic and spark new life along the Anacostia.” View high resolution

Washington, D.C., moved a big step closer this week toward building its own “bridge to the future.” Two well-known design firms — OMA and OLIN — were selected as the winners of a competition to conceptualize the 11th Street Bridge Park.

The plan is an inventive reuse of old infrastructure that could help to revitalize a long-underserved part of the city. The old crumbling 11th Street Bridge used to carry the I-295 freeway over Anacostia River. It has since been replaced, and the deck of the old bridge has been demolished, leaving only the piers standing in the middle of the water. The city wants to top those old piers with a brand new park and a new bridge intended to support foot traffic and spark new life along the Anacostia.”

Educators Worry Technology Hampers Study Abroad Experience

I AM FAMOUS.

C and I were on the Slovak news last week. After spending way too much time at the Slovak Foreign Police applying for permits to live here, we were recorded by a local news station. 
Fast forward to the 2:26 mark to see the absurd look of sheer joy on my face as we finally leave after 8+ hours. 
Interested in watching the clip with audio (because all my readers know Slovak, right?)? Click HERE and look for “Cudzinci musia nocovat na policii” on the left side of the screen. 

UHN │ Hockey in the Heart of Russia: Interview with Kevin Lalande

Clarence Creek, Ontario is a small town about a half an hour from Ottawa. It’s population, rolled up with the populations of six surrounding communities, is just over 23,000. It was here that Kevin Lalande got his start in the crease. Now, over 7,000 kilometers from home, the once small-town-Canadian boy hits the ice in Russia’s bustling capital city of 11.5 million people. Standing between the pipes in the shadows of Moscow’s Kremlin and iconic St. Basil’s Cathedral, the 26-year old goaltender has found his stride playing in the Kontinental Hockey League.

Kevin Lalande warming up at a September 2014 CSKA Moscow vs HC Slovan game. 
Read my interview with Lalande at Ultimate Hockey Network.  View high resolution

Kevin Lalande warming up at a September 2014 CSKA Moscow vs HC Slovan game. 

Read my interview with Lalande at Ultimate Hockey Network. 

You know, I’d like to say you get used to it, but you don’t really. It’s one of those things where your mind has to be at the right place, and I think that’s the biggest challenge. Once you get to the rink, it’s hockey, it doesn’t matter if you’re in Canada, Slovakia or Russia. It’s a little black puck and that’s what it comes down to.

The Sickness.

I’ve been counting down the days until R’s arrival in Europe for over 2 months. I started at 60+ days and, as of this morning, the count is down to 11. Being 2 days from single digits should make me happier. But, instead, I felt super bummed out this morning looking at the countdown. I’d rather be 11 days from R and Rocky in PA. Homesickness.

Homesickness, I have learned from Internet research, comes in phases. There’s the Honeymoon phase, followed by depression, followed by a (relatively happy) period of adjustment, usually followed by more depression, and finally acceptance of one’s new environment.

My “Honeymoon” phase was exciting, but also riddled with uncertainty and constant feelings of “I made a huge mistake”. For the past 6 weeks I’ve been feeling content adjustment. I’ve settled into my role as teacher. I’ve been happily chatting with R multiple times a day. I’ve been exploring and traveling. I feel real affection for my new city.

But today? Today I don’t want to be on the bus going to school in Slovakia. I want to be on my front porch, in my Adirondack chair, enjoying the MidAtlantic autumn with my dog and a cup of coffee.

I almost started listing all the stuff I miss, but I’ll spare us all the gory details. All we need to know is that today I’m missing home.

11 days until Ryan is here. Triple digits until I’m back on my front porch.

What I did in school today: moderated debates between my youngest students. I took a break from debating gun control (which I’m doing with my older kids), and we debated YouTube vs Facebook; Aliens vs Ghosts; USA vs UK. I cried during the Aliens vs Ghosts debate because I was laughing so hard.
“Ghosts don’t need to pay for the cinema or concerts.”
“Yea, well, Casper is a loser!”
Awww, kids. View high resolution

What I did in school today: moderated debates between my youngest students. I took a break from debating gun control (which I’m doing with my older kids), and we debated YouTube vs Facebook; Aliens vs Ghosts; USA vs UK. I cried during the Aliens vs Ghosts debate because I was laughing so hard.
“Ghosts don’t need to pay for the cinema or concerts.”
“Yea, well, Casper is a loser!”
Awww, kids.

Slovak Cooking

knowslovakia:

This is a very nice website dedicated to Slovak home-made cooking and more. All recipes are written in English and have picture instructions so it’s very easy to follow.

I’ve been waiting over 40 days for the countdown to read “0”.
Today I see my lovely amica Sandra in Prague.
And we packed our matching tube tops.
Of course.

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